Chocolate Crémeux with a Dacquoise Biscuit

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Superfoods and raw foods may be the culinary trends du jour, but there’s still something about a decadent chocolate dessert that can tip most diet-devotees of the wagon, if only for an indulgent moment.

This is one such dessert. You know the kind: almost too pretty to be eaten, seemingly rich, but wonderfully light at the same time. Transporting, satiating, moreish. Drooling yet? Stop reading, and start baking!

Chocolate and Coffee Crémeux on Dacquoise:

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Ingredients:

  • 200g full cream milk
  • 200g mascarpone
  • 80g egg yolk, about 4 yolk
  • 40g caster sugar
  • 155g dark chocolate
  • 5g instant coffee

Method:

  1. Boil the milk, mascarpone and the instant coffee.
  2. Whisk the yolk and sugar together until slightly white.
  3. Pour the boiled milk over the eggs in two times while whisking non stop!
  4. Cook the mix over medium heat until it reaches 83 degrees Celsius, just like a crème anglaise.
  5. Place the chocolate in an electric mixer bowl and pour the hot mix over it while whisking. Whisk until the chocolate is completely melted.
  6. Transfer the mix into a clean recipient and wrap it with cling film, making sure it’s in direct contact, and place in the fridge until the next day.

Dacquoise:

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Ingredients:

  • 3 egg whites
  • 35g plain flour
  • 70g Hazelnut powder
  • 70g icing sugar
  • 30g caster sugar

Method:

  1. Preheat the oven at 240 degrees celsius
  2. Whisk the egg white in an electric mixer until they become slightly firm, then start adding the sugar. Whisk for about 3-4 minutes to obtain a nice meringue.
  3. Gently fold in the icing sugar and hazelnut powder using a rubber spatula.
  4. Then gently add the flour to the meringue.
  5. Spread the mix on a flat baking tray lined with baking paper, about 1cm thickness, and bake for 6 minutes.

Cut the Dacquoise using a round cookie cutter, the size you use is up to you!

Pipe the crémeux on the biscuit using a pipping bag with a star nozzle and garnish with fresh raspberries.

The richness of the crémeux, the nuttiness of the biscuit and the acidity of the raspberries create, I think, a well balanced dessert!

Bon Appétit

Le Fermier

Jean-François’s Mousse au Chocolat: Jean-François Chocolate Mousse

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This decadent dessert is a favourite among restaurant go-ers at the Restaurant de L’Abbaye and I’m thrilled to be able to share the chef’s recipe with you today. Once you taste the rich and creamy texture of this mousse you’ll be surprised at how straightforward it is to make, and because it will keep for a few days in the fridge, I think it’s the perfect ‘wow-factor’ dessert to make in advance when you’re entertaining guests.

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There’s no oven time required for this chocolate mousse, which has the added advantage of allowing you to be creative with your presentation. There are the usual ramekins or decorative bowls, but you could also set the mousse in vintage crystal glasses or teacups for an afternoon tea with a twist.

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The most important thing to keep in mind with this dish is the darker the chocolate you use, the richer the finished product; so don’t overdose on a good thing by serving your guests enormous portions! Less is always more when it comes to indulgence.

Ingredients:

  • 450g dark chocolate
  • 10 egg yolk
  • 10 egg whites
  • 200g caster sugar

Method:

  1. Break the chocolate into little pieces and place them into a stainless steel bowl. Place the bowl on a bain-marie, turn the heat to the lowest setting and leave the chocolate to melt slowly.
  2. In the meantime separate the egg whites and egg yolks. Place the yolks into an electric mixer bowl with the sugar and whisk at high speed until it becomes slightly white and fluffy or about double in size. Then pour the mixture in a large mixing bowl and keep aside.
  3. Whisk the egg whites with a tablespoon of sugar until the mixture forms soft peaks, i.e. until the mixture holds its shape for a little bit (or another way to know if it’s ready is to tip the bowl upside down and if the misture stays in!)
  4. Combine the melted chocolate and the yolk mixture and slowly fold them together using a spatula.
  5. Then add about a ¼ of the whites at a time and gently mix them with chocolate mixture.
  6. Portion the chocolate mousse into individual little bowl and leave to set in the fridge for a few hours or overnight.
  7. Serve by itself or with some sable biscuit on the side!

Madeleine

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I often feel that much of the magic and romanticism surrounding French food lies in the mysterious origins of so many dishes. Factual histories become Chinese whispers, embellished and morphed along the way until each version has as many likelihoods and doubts as the next.

Madeleines are a perfect example of this, where the only thing we can be sure of is that they are truly scrumptious (and it’s probably also safe to say they were named after someone named Madeleine).

It’s accepted that these little cakes hail from the French town of Commercy, in the North of the Lorraine Region of France, and is now considered a speciality of the area. Beyond this, there is lots of conjecture on what the true origin of the Madeleine is.

One version claims that they were a family recipe, made by a cook named Madeleine, for her noble employer, Slanislaw L. Slanislaw’s daughter (and wife of Louis XV), Maria, shared them with the King who adored them and decided to name them after their maker. I like this version, but this doesn’t explain the unusual seashell shape, which is what makes this dessert so recognisable.

Another version, which is less romantic but explains the shape, poses that they were again made by and named after a cook called Madeleine, but this Madeleine was making them for pilgrims tracing the path through France to the final resting place of Saint-Jacques (St. James, the patron saint of Spain) whose symbol was the seashell.

While you’re mulling over your own thoughts on the matter, why not grab a coffee or tea and might I suggest adding the perfect petit-four to match – a Madeleine!

Madeleine:

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Ingredients:

  • 375 g caster sugar
  • 4 eggs (medium size)
  • 250 ml full fat milk
  • 200 g unsalted butter
  • 500 plain flour
  • 15g baking powder
  • 2 Tbsp vanilla essence or 1 vanilla pod seeded
  • 50 g grated coconut
  • 1 orange zest

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Method:

  1.  Preheat the oven at 200-220 degrees Celsius.
  2. In a mixing bowl, lightly whisk the eggs, sugar, 50ml of milk and the vanilla, then add the coconut and orange zest.
  3. Sieve the flour and the baking powder.
  4. Slowly add the flour to the egg mix while mixing with a spatula.
  5. Once the flour is mixed through add the rest of the milk, and mix until the milk is incorporated.
  6. Add the warm melted butter and mix until combined.
  7. Lightly spray the Madeleine mould.
  8. With a spoon or a pipping bag place the mixture in the Madeleine mould and bake for 10 minutes. Take them out of the mould as soon as they come out of the oven and place them on a cooling rack.

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Serve the Madeleine warm for an afternoon tea or for an after dinner treat with a glass of Chateau Viranel “Gourmandise” available from www.airoldifinewines.com.au .