Salmon Terrine with a beetroot and mustard seeds relish

salmonterrine_lefermier_101215Terrines are always a great addition to the table, because there are so many different type and flavours. You can do one with vegetables, meat, fish, cheese or even ice cream! Terrines have been around for a long time but I think they are still popular with the foodies.

Today I’ve decided to show how to do a delicious salmon terrine with a beetroot and mustard seeds relish. It’s an easy recipe that can be done the day before and save you a little bit of time on Christmas day!

You can watch the how to video below or visit my YouTube channel here

I’ve matched this delicious terrine with a Domaine Bertrand-Bergé “ Le Méconnu” 2013 from www.airoldifinewines.com.au

Ingredients for the terrine:

  • 1 brown onion
  • 1 carrot
  • ½ bunch parsley
  • ½ bunch dill
  • 500g white fish
  • 300g salmon
  • 175ml water
  • 2 free range eggs
  • salt and pepper
  • Piment d’espelette (espelette chili), optional

salmonterrine1_lefermier_Method:

  1. Preheat the oven at 180 degrees Celsius and boil the kettle.
  2. Blitz the carrot and onion in a food processor until it is quiet fine. Then heat up frying pan with a little bit of oil and cook the carrot and onion on medium heat until it soften a little bit, keep aside.
  3. Blitz the parsley and dill until finely chopped, then add both the white fish and salmon and mix until smooth.
  4. Add the eggs, the onion and carrot and slowly add the water until you have a smooth consistency. Season with salt, pepper and the chili.
  5. Transfer the mix into a terrine, put the lid on or cover with foil and cook in the bain-marie in the oven for 50-60 minutes.
  6. Once the terrine is cooked, place it in the fridge to cool down completely.

salmonterrine2_lefermier_Ingredients for the relish

  • 3-4 beetroots
  • 200g brown sugar
  • 80g yellow mustard seeds
  • 1 cup vinegar
  • 1 onion, finely diced

Method:

  1. Heat up a sauce pan with a little olive oil, add the onion and mustard seeds, and cook until the onion soften.
  2. Peel and grate the beetroot in the food processor, add it to the onion.
  3. Add the sugar, vinegar and a little bit of water, then cook on medium heat for about 1 hour, stirring from time to time.

 

Rosewater Honeycomb with dark chocolate and lavender flower

Honeycomb1_lefermier_221115Honeycomb is a fun and simple Amuse-Bouche that is full of flavour, light and delicious . It is also a great addition to many dessert recipes like waffles, ice cream or sprinkled on top of a berry crumble. Perfect little treat to go with your coffee and tea at the end of you meal or you can also package them to give them as presents to your friend or family!!!

Ingredients:

  • 300g caster sugar
  • 1 cup water, about 250ml
  • 3 tablespoon baking soda
  • 200g dark chocolate
  • Dried lavender flower, or dried edible flowers
  • 20ml rosewater

Honeycomb3_lefermier_221115Method:

  1. Line a deep stainless steel bowl with baking paper.
  2. Place the sugar and water into a saucepan and stir to dissolve the sugar. Clean the side of the saucepan with a pastry brush and a little bit of water, to prevent the sugar from crystallising.
  3. Bring the sugar to the boil and cook it until it become slightly brown, you only want a pale caramel.
  4. Take it of the heat, put the saucepan next to the stainless steel bowl, and pour the baking soda in the caramel while whisking very quickly , Do not whisk for too long, only a few seconds. Once you add the baking soda it will rise very quickly a little like a volcano!
  5. Pour the honeycomb in the bowl as soon as you stop whisking and leave to cool down completely. It should  become hard pretty quickly.
  6. In the meantime, break down the chocolate in a stainless steel bowl and melt it over a bain-marie.
  7. Break the honeycomb into big chunks, dip half of them into the chocolate and the flowers. Leave the chocolate cool down so it hardens and they are ready to be served!

 

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Christmas Lunch : Honey and Spice Quail with a Fresh Grapes and Nuts Salad

DSC_0823It’s that time of the year again, the festive season is nearly here! Time to start planning what you’re going to eat for Christmas lunch or even Christmas eve. It is an exciting time of the year with all the cooking, baking and tasting of all those delicious Christmas dishes.

The honey and spice quail is good way to start your Christmas lunch, as you can have it as part of a sharing platter or as an entrée on its own. This recipe is a spin on the more traditional ( Caille aux Raisin) Quail with a grape sauce. I chose to marinate it in honey, verjuice, 5 spice, tangerine peel and sage to give the meat a unique flavour. I made a fresh grapes, rocket and nuts salad to match my quails, the salad adds freshness to the dish and complement it perfectly.

quail5_lefermier_231115Honey and Spice pan seared quail: serve 4

Ingredients:

  • 4 boned quails, Halved
  • 8 tablespoon honey
  • 2 tea spoon 5 spice
  • 375ml verjuice
  • 100ml water
  • 1 bunch sage, chopped
  • 1 garlic head, quartered
  • 10 peppercorn
  • 2 tangerine peel

Method:

  1. Mix the honey, verjuice, water, five spice and sage together.
  2. Place the quail in a container deep enough to contain the marinade.
  3. Pour the marinate over the quails and leave to rest in the fridge for a couple of hours.
  4. Take the quail out of the marinade and pat dry. Heat up a large frying pan with a little bit of olive oil.
  5. Cook the quail skin side down first for about 4 minutes on medium heat.
  6. Turn the quail around and cook for a further 2-3 minutes. Remove the quails from the pan and pour the marinade in, reduce until it starts to thicken and then put the quails back in and toss them around to coat them with the sauce.

quail6_lefermier_241115For the salad;

Ingredients:

  • 50g almond, roughly chopped
  • 30g pinenuts
  • 50g hazelnuts, roughly chopped
  • 150g fresh grapes, halved
  • 150g baby rocket
  • 150g baby leaves

Method:

  1. Mix the almonds, pinenuts, hazelnuts  together in a salad bowl.
  2. Mix with the fresh grapes and baby leaves.
  3. Whisk 1 tablespoon of Dijon mustard, 3 tablespoon of white wine vinegar, pinch of salt, 1 clove crush garlic and olive oil to taste together and drizzle over the salad.

 

DSC_0805Wine Suggestion: Domaine de Baron’Arques Le Chardonnay Limoux from www.airoldifinewines.com.au


Bastille Day Entrée : Snails in garlic butter

garlicsnails3_lefermier_050715

As famous as the French are for crisp croissants and delectable desserts, they are equally infamous for less conventional dishes like frog’s legs and snails. Being someone who is deeply passionate about food and flavour, I believe you can’t knock something until you’ve tried it, so if you’ve never been game to try “escargot” before, this is your moment to bite the bullet!

If you need more convincing, then how about the fact that snails are high in protein and, on their own, quite low in fat. However, today’s recipe is not one for the health nuts because the key accompaniment is butter, butter and more butter. The up side is that if you were worried about your snails tasting too “snaily”, then never fear, as long as you love butter, garlic and parsley!

Serve your snails as an entrée on a bed of rock salt (to prevent the shells from tipping over and letting that delicious butter sauce escaping) with crusty baguette so that you can mop up the butter afterwards.

Snails in garlic butter:

garlicsnails2_lefermier_050715

Ingredients:

  • 1 tin of snails
  • 1 container empty snail shell
  • 300g butter, soft
  • ½ bunch parsley, washed and finely chopped
  • 80g garlic, peeled and grated
  • 10 ml Ricard or Pernod
  • 300 g rock salt

garlicsnails1_lefermier_050715

Method:

  1. Mix the soft butter, garlic, parsley and Ricard together well and season with salt and pepper.
  2. Drain the snail and give them a quick rinse. Put one snail per shell and spoon the garlic butter on each shell.
  3. Place the rock salt on a flat baking tray, or you can use foil like i did, place the snails on top of it, the salt will help the snail stay upright so the butter doesn’t run away!
  4. Cook in the oven for 10 minutes at 180 degrees Celsius.

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Serve hot with some Baguette on the side and a glass of Chateau Ollieux Romanis “Corbière Blanc available from http://www.airoldifinewines.com.au 

Coq au Vin

 

coqauvin5_lefermier_020715

Coq au Vin is considered one of the all-time classic French recipes. Presumably, the original recipe called for Rooster, as the translation of the dish’s name is “Rooster in wine” but today it’s very much considered a chicken dish. This one-pot wonder is a delightful concoction of browned chicken, red wine sauce with salty pork lardons and mushrooms.

The best thing about this dish is that it tastes even better the day after you’ve cooked it because all the ingredients steep together overnight, making it a perfect dish to prepare in advance for guests or a busy week ahead.

More traditional recipes call for Burgundy wine, but I chose to make this recipe with Shiraz as I feel it gives the sauce more depth of flavour. There are some regions in France that use white wine for Coq au Vin, so really, you can feel free to experiment with your favourite grape variety.

Ingredients:

  • 1 free range chicken, around 2 kg and cut into 12 pieces
  • 2 litre red wine (I used shiraz but burgundy or Bordeaux are also popular choices)
  • 1 Bouquet garni (Make a fresh one from thyme, parsley and bay leaves – no pre-made teabags!)
  • 2 carrots, peeled and chopped
  • 1 celery stick, cleaned and chopped
  • 1 brown onion, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 5 garlic cloves, peeled and sliced
  • 3 cloves
  • Peppercorns
  • 1 small glass cognac or brandy

coqauvin4_lefermier_020715

Method:

  1. Put the chicken pieces into a deep cooking pot. I like to use my Le Creuset Round French Oven for slow cooking.
  2. Add the celery, bouquet garni, brown onion, carrots, garlic, cloves, peppercorns, cognac and red wine. Leave to marinate for 5-6 hours or overnight in a cool spot in the kitchen.

For the Sauce:

Ingredients:

  • 3 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 25g unsalted butter or duck fat
  • 40g plain flour
  • 4 slice pork belly rashers, diced or cut into Lardons
  • 350g button mushroom, cleaned and quartered
  • 1 brown onion, diced

coqauvin3_lefermier_020715

Method:

  1. Take the chicken out of the marinade, discard the vegetables and pour the remaining wine into a jug.
  2. Place the cooking pot on high heat and add the olive oil and butter (or duck fat). Place the chicken into the pot and seal on all side until golden brown. Remove from the pot and keep aside.
  3. Add the onion and lardons to the pot and cook until slightly brown.
  4. Sprinkle the flour over the top of the onion and lardons and slowly add the wine while whisking. Whisk well to make sure everything is mixed through.
  5. Add the chicken, season with salt and pepper and cook for 1 ½ -2 hours on a low heat with the lid on but slightly open to let the steam out.
  6. Heat up a non-stick frying pan without anything in it. Add the mushroom and cook until they stop releasing water. Add them the pot ½ hour before the end of cooking.

coqauvin2_lefermier_020715

Side:

Ingredients:

  • 1 bunch purple Baby Dutch carrots, peeled
  • 1 bunch Baby Dutch carrots, peeled
  • 1 bunch white Baby Dutch carrots, peeled
  • 12 Kipflers potatoes, cleaned, peeled and cut in half

coqauvin_lefermier_020715

Method:

  1. Preheat the oven at 180 degrees Celsius.
  2. Place the vegetables on a roasting tray, drizzle with olive oil, sprinkle with Herb de Provence and season with salt and pepper.
  3. Cook for 45 minutes or until tender.

I suggest you serve the coq au Vin with a fresh crusty baguette and a glass of EVOI Cabernet Sauvignon available from Airoldi Fine Wines.

Watch the how to video below or visit my Youtube channel  here for more.

 

Haricot Couennes

Haricot Couennes

haricotcouenne3_lefermier_250615

On my recent trip to France I had the pleasure of joining my Mum in her kitchen to prepare a family feast. For the main course we made Confit de Canard (Confit Duck Legs) and on the side, a dish I had completely forgotten about these past few years, but was overjoyed to be reacquainted with. Haricot Couennes is a slow cooked lingot bean dish (the same beans as used for a Cassoulet) with roughly chopped chunks of pork rind (known as Couennes), onion and herbs. The fatty pork rind injects oodles of flavour and the stewing process creates a rich sauce, just begging to be mopped up with crusty rustic bread. A traditional dish of the Dordogne region, it was the perfect garnish for our duck, but it would work equally well with a good steak, chicken breast or pork fillet.

Serve with a good red wine such as Hermitage or a Cote Rotie. Available from www.airoldifinewines.com.au (côte rôtie only).

Haricotcouenne1_lefermier_250615

Ingredients:

  • 1 brown onion, diced
  • 4 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 bunch thyme, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 10cl white wine
  • 250g lard (pork rind)
  • 1kg haricot beans (unless you can find lingot beans)

haricotcouenne2_lefermier_250615

Method:

  1. Soak the beans in cold water the night before.
  2. Cook the haricot beans in salted water for about 1hour. You still want the beans to be a little firm. Once cooked, drain half the cooking liquid and keep the other half in the pot with the beans.
  3. At the same time, but in a separate pot, cook the lard in salted water but for ¾ of an hour, as this will soften the lard. Drain all the liquid and place the lard to the side.
  4. Heat up a large casserole pot (a Le Creuset or similar is ideal, if you have one) on medium heat with some olive oil. Add the onion, garlic and thyme and cook for a few minutes. Then add the tomato paste and cook a few more minutes, to get rid of the bitterness of the paste.
  5. Dice the cooked lard and add it to the casserole, give everything a good stir and deglaze with the wine.
  6. Add the beans and the cooking liquid. Cook for about 15 minutes, season with salt and pepper.