Country Terrine

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Terrine and patés have been around for a very long time. Egyptians used to fatten geese with dried figs and use their fat oozing organs like the liver for example to make patés and terrine. Paté became very popular in France  around the 15th  century. By the 16th century the fattened goose liver paté, paté de Perigeux paté de la Contades was very popular. The pate de La Contades originaly contained no truffle until 1789 when a chef from the Perigord in the south west of France arrived in Strasbourg and introduced the concept which still continues today. Patés are a spreadable paste of meat, herbs, spices, wine or liquor and served with toast for texture. Terrine is a glazed terracotta mould  often of oval shape. Terrine mixture are chunky and consist mainly of feathered game such as quail, pheasant and venison, the mixture are then baked. The fat on top preserve the terrines and prevent them from drying out on top.

 

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Recipe:

–          1 Tbsp caster sugar

–          50 ml rum

–          50 ml port

–          6 tbsp olive oil

–          4 onion coarsely chopped

–          4 shallots coarsely chopped

–          3 garlic cloves gratted

–          400 g pork belly minced

–          300 g pork shoulder minced

–          300 g pigs liver or chicken liver minced

–          2 eggs

–          100 ml double cream

–          5 fresh parsley sprigs

–          2 fresh thyme sprigs

–          1 bay leaves

–          6-8 strips of bacon

–          100 g chanterelles mushroom ( dried or fresh)

Method:  Preheat the oven at  180 degree celcius• Mix together the sugar, rum and port together in a small bowl, stirring the sugar until dissolve• Heat the olive oil int a pan, add the onions, garlic, shallots and chanterelles mushroom ( soaked in warm water if using dried mushrooms), cook over low heat stirring occasionally  for about 10 minutes  until lightly brown• Stir in the rum mixture, heat for a few seconds and ignite• When the flames have died down, cook until caramelized then remove from heat.

Mix together the meat, eggs and cream. Add the onions, shallots and garlic and season with salt and pepper. Mix the chopped parsley with  the thyme leave  and stir in• Make a lattice pattern (cross)at  the bottom of the mould then spoon  the mixture in the  terrine mould  put the bayleaves on top and repeat the pattern on to finish• Put the terrine in a roasting tray, pour in boiling water to come about half way up the sides and bake for two hours. Leave the terrine to stand for 48 hours before serving.

You can enjoy this terrine with a fresh baguette, fig bread, cornichons or other pickles.

Bon Appetit .

Le Fermier

Chicken Chasseur

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Sauce chasseur also known as “hunter sauceis a brown sauce used in French cooking traditionally to cook game meat such as venison, rabbit, wild fowl and other meats. It often contains mushroom and shallots. Traditionally, while returning from the hunt, the hunters would pick the mushrooms that they would then use to prepare the sauce. In this recipe i used port instead of brandy as i find that it give the sauce more body. Chasseur is thought to have been invented by Philippe de Mornay, who is also credited with inventing Mornay sauce, bechamel, sauce Lyonnaise, and sauce Porto.

 

Chicken Chasseur

For the chicken:

–          500g chicken thighs
–          4 shallots
–          4 garlic cloves
–          1 bunch thyme
–          1 punnet Swiss brown mushroom
–          150g sliced bacon
–          150ml port
–          150 ml red wine
–          600 ml vegetable stock
–          Salt and  pepper
–          Corn flour

Method: Heat up your pot on medium heat with a drizzle of olive • Slice the shallots, crushed the garlic and chop the thyme • Add the shallots, thyme and garlic to the pot and cook on medium heat for a few minutes or until the shallots starts to brown a little • Dice the bacon and add them to the pot • Roughly cut the chicken thighs and add them to the casserole. Cook the chicken until golden brown • Add the port and reduce by about half, then add the red wine and again reduce by about half • Finally add the vegetable stock and cook on high heat until it starts boiling then turn the heat down to medium and cook for 30 minutes • Mix a little bit of corn flour with some water and add to the sauce to thicken it • Season to taste.

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For the roasted potatoes:

–          600g desire potatoes
–          2 sprigs rosemary
–          Olive oil

Method: Peel the potato • Put them in a pot and submerge them with cold water, cook them until just tender • Drain them and shake them well to get rough edges • Spread them on a roasting tray, drizzle with olive oil and roast in a hot oven (220 degrees celcius) until crispy • Take them out of the oven and sprinkle with chopped rosemary and salt.

Bon Appetit,
Le Fermier

Pan Fried Snapper with Braised Chickpea and Pancetta

 

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Snapper or “ Dorade “ in French is one of those fish that  has a “meaty” texture and a strong taste, but I have to say is one of my favourite fish. Its “meatiness “ is why this fish goes perfectly with the braised chickpea and pancetta, the texture of the chickpea and the spicy flavour of the mild pancetta binds so well with the snapper. Enjoy this wonderful dish.

Bon appetit.

 

For the chick pea :

–          1 packet dried chickpeas ( about 375 g )

–          2 brown onions

–          5 cloves garlic

–          1 bunch thyme

–          1 Table spoon tomato paste

–          1 litre vegetable stock

–          4-5 thickly sliced pancetta

–           2 dried chili

–          2 teaspoon corn flour

 

Method :  Soak the chickpeas in cold water overnight. Dice your onions, crush the garlic, chop the thyme and dice the pancetta• Pour about 50 ml of olive oil in your pot and add your onions, garlic, thyme and diced pancetta and cook for 5 minutes• Add the chickpeas and stir• Add the stock and cook for about 1 hour on medium heat or until tender• To thicken the sauce, mix the corn flour with a little bit of water, just enough to dissolve it and pour it into the sauce while mixing• Season to taste

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For the fish:

–          4 snapper fillets

–          Salt and pepper

–          Olive oil

 

Method : Using a sharp knife slightly cut the skin of the fish , this will allow the heat to go through the fish quicker resulting in a shorter cooking time and also prevent the fish from curling while cooking• Season the fish with salt and pepper• Heat up a large frying pan on medium heat and drizzle with olive oil, once the pan starts smoking gently add the fish skin side down• When the fish is cooked about ¾ of the way turn it and turn the gas off, leave for 30 second and rest•

 

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