Pork fillet fricassé in a Chablis sauce

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Growing up with parents who were both passionate about food, it’s no wonder that my brother’s and I are involved in the hospitality industry in some way. My eldest brother studied viticulture, I have been a chef for over 15 years and my older brother is the proud founder of Airoldi Fine Wines, through which he imports some the finest specialty and premium French wines into Australia.

As part of his ongoing passion to educate Australian wine lovers about some of the best wines our motherland has to offer, he regularly holds intimate dinners, often hosted by the winemakers themselves. This month I was lucky enough to attend one such dinner, hosted by Benjamin Laroche of La Manufacture Wines, Chablis, France.

The Chablis region, located within Burgundy is classed as an appellation, meaning that only wines from that geographic area may be called Chablis. The prominent wine variety is a chardonnay, which makes it perfect for pairing with leaner meat like pork.

Inspired by La Manufacture’s exquisite Chablis wines, I’ve created this pork dish which heroes the fruity and crisp flavours that they are known for.

Ingredients:

  • 1 pork fillet, about 500g and diced
  • 1 bunch thyme
  • 2 brown onions, sliced
  • 5 cloves garlic, chopped
  • ½ bunch parsley, chopped
  • 2 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 3 tablespoon crème fraîche
  • 400ml beef stock
  • 250ml Chablis wine
  • 10 button mushroom, quartered and sautéed
  • 100g smoked bacon, diced

 

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Method:

  1. Heat up a casserole pan with some olive oil and a nob of butter.
  2. Seal the pork on all sides until it start to carmelised. You may need to do it in 2-3 batches to avoid boiling the meat, then keep aside.
  3. Add the onions and garlic to the pan and cook for 3-4 minutes on medium heat then add the thyme. Now you can add the bacon to the mix.
  4. Deglaze the pan with the wine, making sure to scrap the bottom of the pan with a wooden spoon to unstick all the delicious bits. Then add the mushroom.
  5. Put the pork and juices back in the pan and pour in the stock. Bring the sauce to the boil and then add the mustard. Cook on medium heat for 25-30 minutes.
  6. Add the crème fraîche and simmer for a further 15 minutes.
  7. Adjust the seasoning if necessary and finish the sauce with some chopped parsley.

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A delicious side of glazed baby Dutch carrot slowly cooked in butter and sautéed Tuscan Kale with a touch of garlic is, I think the perfect match!

As a matching wine I suggest “La Manufacture” Chablis from Benjamin Laroche available from www.airoldifinewines.com.au

Watch the how to video here or visit my Youtube channel here for more videos.

Haricot Couennes

Haricot Couennes

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On my recent trip to France I had the pleasure of joining my Mum in her kitchen to prepare a family feast. For the main course we made Confit de Canard (Confit Duck Legs) and on the side, a dish I had completely forgotten about these past few years, but was overjoyed to be reacquainted with. Haricot Couennes is a slow cooked lingot bean dish (the same beans as used for a Cassoulet) with roughly chopped chunks of pork rind (known as Couennes), onion and herbs. The fatty pork rind injects oodles of flavour and the stewing process creates a rich sauce, just begging to be mopped up with crusty rustic bread. A traditional dish of the Dordogne region, it was the perfect garnish for our duck, but it would work equally well with a good steak, chicken breast or pork fillet.

Serve with a good red wine such as Hermitage or a Cote Rotie. Available from www.airoldifinewines.com.au (côte rôtie only).

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Ingredients:

  • 1 brown onion, diced
  • 4 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 bunch thyme, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 10cl white wine
  • 250g lard (pork rind)
  • 1kg haricot beans (unless you can find lingot beans)

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Method:

  1. Soak the beans in cold water the night before.
  2. Cook the haricot beans in salted water for about 1hour. You still want the beans to be a little firm. Once cooked, drain half the cooking liquid and keep the other half in the pot with the beans.
  3. At the same time, but in a separate pot, cook the lard in salted water but for ¾ of an hour, as this will soften the lard. Drain all the liquid and place the lard to the side.
  4. Heat up a large casserole pot (a Le Creuset or similar is ideal, if you have one) on medium heat with some olive oil. Add the onion, garlic and thyme and cook for a few minutes. Then add the tomato paste and cook a few more minutes, to get rid of the bitterness of the paste.
  5. Dice the cooked lard and add it to the casserole, give everything a good stir and deglaze with the wine.
  6. Add the beans and the cooking liquid. Cook for about 15 minutes, season with salt and pepper.

 

 

 

Country Terrine

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Terrine and patés have been around for a very long time. Egyptians used to fatten geese with dried figs and use their fat oozing organs like the liver for example to make patés and terrine. Paté became very popular in France  around the 15th  century. By the 16th century the fattened goose liver paté, paté de Perigeux paté de la Contades was very popular. The pate de La Contades originaly contained no truffle until 1789 when a chef from the Perigord in the south west of France arrived in Strasbourg and introduced the concept which still continues today. Patés are a spreadable paste of meat, herbs, spices, wine or liquor and served with toast for texture. Terrine is a glazed terracotta mould  often of oval shape. Terrine mixture are chunky and consist mainly of feathered game such as quail, pheasant and venison, the mixture are then baked. The fat on top preserve the terrines and prevent them from drying out on top.

 

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Recipe:

–          1 Tbsp caster sugar

–          50 ml rum

–          50 ml port

–          6 tbsp olive oil

–          4 onion coarsely chopped

–          4 shallots coarsely chopped

–          3 garlic cloves gratted

–          400 g pork belly minced

–          300 g pork shoulder minced

–          300 g pigs liver or chicken liver minced

–          2 eggs

–          100 ml double cream

–          5 fresh parsley sprigs

–          2 fresh thyme sprigs

–          1 bay leaves

–          6-8 strips of bacon

–          100 g chanterelles mushroom ( dried or fresh)

Method:  Preheat the oven at  180 degree celcius• Mix together the sugar, rum and port together in a small bowl, stirring the sugar until dissolve• Heat the olive oil int a pan, add the onions, garlic, shallots and chanterelles mushroom ( soaked in warm water if using dried mushrooms), cook over low heat stirring occasionally  for about 10 minutes  until lightly brown• Stir in the rum mixture, heat for a few seconds and ignite• When the flames have died down, cook until caramelized then remove from heat.

Mix together the meat, eggs and cream. Add the onions, shallots and garlic and season with salt and pepper. Mix the chopped parsley with  the thyme leave  and stir in• Make a lattice pattern (cross)at  the bottom of the mould then spoon  the mixture in the  terrine mould  put the bayleaves on top and repeat the pattern on to finish• Put the terrine in a roasting tray, pour in boiling water to come about half way up the sides and bake for two hours. Leave the terrine to stand for 48 hours before serving.

You can enjoy this terrine with a fresh baguette, fig bread, cornichons or other pickles.

Bon Appetit .

Le Fermier

Grand Marnier and Orange Crème Brulée

creme brulee blog photo 5   Orange and Grand Marnier Crème Brulee: The  Crème Brulée  was  born in the XVII  century. During this period dishes were served to guests in  three different service , by the time all the quest received their meals it would be cold. During a dinner organized by Phillip D’orleans, he complained that his “ Crème”  was too cold. They had the idea to apply a hot iron on top to warm up the cream. Instead it caramelised the top without warming up the cream, the “ Crème Brulée “ was born.     creme brulee blog photo 2

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Recipe:

18 yolk

350 g sugar

orange zest

20 ml Grand Marnier

1.2 litres cream

Method: Boil the cream and orange zest , whisk egg yolks and sugar together• Pour the cream in the egg and sugar mix and whisk, then pour the mix back in the pot• Wash your bowl and dry it with a clean towel• Cook the Crème on a medium heat stirring it with a wooden spoon and whisking it from time to time.  Using a thermometer cook the Crème until about 80 degrees, you should see a swirl of fat forming at the top• Pour the cream back into the cleaned bowl and whisk for a few minutes until it cools down a little bit. Place an orange segment at the bottom of your  Crème brulée dish and pour the crème over,  put the crème  in the fridge overnight or until set• To caramelised it, sprinkle a thin layer of caster or raw sugar over the top, and caramelise it with a small blow torch or a Crème Brulée iron•   Can also be served with some almond tuiles •

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Porc a la Normande ( slow cook pork fillet in cider and Calvados)

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Normandy is located in north west of France. Normandy is well known for their apple cider, lamb and their beef, but I think most people would know Normandy for their famous cheeses such as Camembert, Livarot , Pont l’Évêque and Brillat-Savarin. As you can tell with this recipe cream is an important ingredient in “Normand” cooking . Normandy is also the biggest producer of oysters, mussels and coquille saint Jacques( scallops) in France. Normandy was  the home of the author of one of the first French cuisine cookbook ” Le Viandier” , Guillaume Tirel known as “Taillevent”.

For the pork ragout :

–          2 Pork fillets or diced pork

–          4 Shallots

–          ¾ litre Apple cider

–          400g Sliced mushroom

–          1 glass Calvados ( Apple brandy)

–          3 Apples

–          200 ml Crème Fraiche

Method: Heat up your pot on high heat with a bit of olive oil then add half of the meat. Cook until it starts to colour then take the meat out and repeat the process with the rest of the meat• Put the meat back in the pot and add the calvados and “Flamber”•  Add the shallots and  colour them for a few minutes•  Add the peeled and diced apples, cover with cider, season with salt and pepper and cook on low heat for 30-40 minutes• Add the sliced mushroom and cook for a further 15-20 minutes• Before serving add the crème fraiche . Reduce the sauce if necessary.

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For the “ Tomates Provencale” ( Provencale tomato)

–          5  vine tomato

–          ½ Bunch continental parsley

–          4 garlic cloves

–          ½ cup bread crumbs (optional)

Method:  Cut the tomatoes in half sideways and place them on a roasting tray • Crush the garlic, chop the parsley and mix them together• Drizzle the tomatoes with extra virgin olive oil, season with salt and pepper• Sprinkle the garlic and parsley over the top and roast at 180 degree celcius for 10-12 minutes.

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Chicken Chasseur

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Sauce chasseur also known as “hunter sauceis a brown sauce used in French cooking traditionally to cook game meat such as venison, rabbit, wild fowl and other meats. It often contains mushroom and shallots. Traditionally, while returning from the hunt, the hunters would pick the mushrooms that they would then use to prepare the sauce. In this recipe i used port instead of brandy as i find that it give the sauce more body. Chasseur is thought to have been invented by Philippe de Mornay, who is also credited with inventing Mornay sauce, bechamel, sauce Lyonnaise, and sauce Porto.

 

Chicken Chasseur

For the chicken:

–          500g chicken thighs
–          4 shallots
–          4 garlic cloves
–          1 bunch thyme
–          1 punnet Swiss brown mushroom
–          150g sliced bacon
–          150ml port
–          150 ml red wine
–          600 ml vegetable stock
–          Salt and  pepper
–          Corn flour

Method: Heat up your pot on medium heat with a drizzle of olive • Slice the shallots, crushed the garlic and chop the thyme • Add the shallots, thyme and garlic to the pot and cook on medium heat for a few minutes or until the shallots starts to brown a little • Dice the bacon and add them to the pot • Roughly cut the chicken thighs and add them to the casserole. Cook the chicken until golden brown • Add the port and reduce by about half, then add the red wine and again reduce by about half • Finally add the vegetable stock and cook on high heat until it starts boiling then turn the heat down to medium and cook for 30 minutes • Mix a little bit of corn flour with some water and add to the sauce to thicken it • Season to taste.

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For the roasted potatoes:

–          600g desire potatoes
–          2 sprigs rosemary
–          Olive oil

Method: Peel the potato • Put them in a pot and submerge them with cold water, cook them until just tender • Drain them and shake them well to get rough edges • Spread them on a roasting tray, drizzle with olive oil and roast in a hot oven (220 degrees celcius) until crispy • Take them out of the oven and sprinkle with chopped rosemary and salt.

Bon Appetit,
Le Fermier